As everyone is hopefully aware, we are fortunate to work for a company who holds Diversity and Inclusion close to our values. We recently formed the D&I committee to ensure this becomes not just something we talk about, but something that runs across everything we do.

As everyone is hopefully aware, we are fortunate to work for a company who holds Diversity and Inclusion close to our values. We recently formed the D&I committee to ensure this becomes not just something we talk about, but something that runs across everything we do.

One of the core pillars of this committee is to take a look internally, about how we operate as a company and as individuals. In our first meeting the topic of personal social media profiles were discussed. We all very quickly agreed that there should be no rigid policy around this. We want to be a company of individual opinions, views and beliefs, and we do not want to stifle that!

That said, we do want to showcase a united and well thought out front, where all staff are educated on issues that affect our industry, those around us and the wider world. As a business, we want to build a culture of openness and learning. More on this will follow in the coming months. Here are some things worth considering when sharing content online:

It is important that everyone starts thinking about the consequences of their words. This applies in person, just as much as it does on social media. The online world is often a place where people publish before they think. It’s so easy!! There are so many high profile cases where people have published controversial content without thinking it through, things they often don’t mean, which has resulted in issues further down the line.

As an employer, we urge you to think about what you are saying before you press ‘publish’ online. Would you say it to someone’s face? If you wouldn’t, have a think about whether you should say it in the first place.

With everything going on in the world right now, it's easy to have heightened emotions. Social media provides a platform for people to react quickly, without thinking. We truly believe we should be talking more and putting less on social media.

One of the best ways to gain a deeper understanding is to have an open conversation. We want to encourage people to be able to do that, helping everyone to learn and understand different views and opinions.

When you do post on social, check your facts.Don’t just share without researching the source. Do your own research if it is not a trusted source and ensure you have a well balanced opinion.

We also advise that you make sure your personal social media is private.If anyone can access what you say, imagine how easy it is for people to take what you publish out of context, reshare it and use it against you. Imagine if anyone could listen to your private conversations with your mates down the pub and then use it against you too! This is exactly what having your social media ‘open’ can lead to.

In addition, it has now become commonplace for prospective employers to check out potential employees' personal social media. Even when you apply for an ESTA or a visa to go to the US, they screen your social media for offensive content. In fact, you need to be able to provide all your social media content for the last 5 years! Something that you thought might have been harmless last year, can genuinely affect you later down the road. Please be aware of this.

As we say, hackajob has chosen not to create a policy. We want you to feel comfortable being yourself and having your own opinion. We just want you to act in a responsible manner, be respectful of your colleagues and our clients, and represent hackajob in the best way possible.

Helpful resources:

https://www.official-esta.com/esta-resources/how-will-the-social-media-information-on-my-esta-application-be-used-by-cbp/

https://travel.state.gov/content/dam/visas/Enhanced%20Vetting/CA%20-%20FAQs%20on%20Social%20Media%20Collection%20-%206-4-2019%20(v.2).pdf

https://www.theredcard.org/resources-and-activities

https://www.dazeddigital.com/politics/article/49420/1/a-running-list-of-anti-racism-resources-protest-police-brutality-george-floyd

https://www.theguardian.com/books/booksblog/2020/jun/03/do-the-work-an-anti-racist-reading-list-layla-f-saad

https://open.buffer.com/lgbtqia-resources/
https://www.cipd.co.uk/knowledge/fundamentals/relations/diversity/factsheet